Accommodation

Delegates travelling from outside Dundee have the option of free accommodation on the night of the 27th on Dundee University's West Park campus.

Check-in is from 5:30pm onwards, with bus transport organised between the conference venue and West Park.

If you need to make your own way to the accommodation at any point, the address is 319 Perth Road, Dundee DD2 1NN.

Keynote — Prof Chris van der Kuyl

Chris headshot

An Entrepreneurial Journey

Chris’s personal experience from graduating in computer science, starting his first company and beyond, including the high and the lows. And looking to the future, what does it hold for the tech sector? What opportunities are out there?

Chris van der Kuyl is an entrepreneur whose expertise combines the start-up, development and market listed business arena in the technology, media and entertainment sectors, and will be telling us about his ‘Entrepreneurial Journey’ from graduating to founding his first company to the present.

Founder, Owner and Chairman of 4J Studios which is one of the UK’s most successful videogame developers and responsible for the multi-million selling and multi-award winning Minecraft Console editions. Minecraft is a global phenomenon and is currently on track to become the most successful videogame of all time.

Chris is a visiting professor of digital entertainment at University of Abertay Dundee and has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Dundee, an honorary Doctor of Business degree from Edinburgh Napier University and Doctor honoris causa from the University of Edinburgh. Elected as one of the youngest Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Chris has been convener of the RSE Young People’s Committee and also sits on the boards of TV Squared, brightsolid Online Technology, Scottish Institute for Enterprise, Scottish EDGE Advisory, UK Digital Catapult, Dundee Science Centre, Dundee Museums Trust, High School of Dundee and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.

Chris is also the founding Chairman of Entrepreneurial Scotland (ES), the organisation recently formed by the coming together of The Entrepreneurial Exchange and The Saltire Foundation. ES represents all Scotland’s Entrepreneurial talent and exists to inspire, connect and develop entrepreneurial behaviour in all Scotland’s people.

Keynote — Prof Mandy Chessell: Progressive Turmoil

Mandy Chessell

Abstract

I graduated in 1987 — 30 years ago! At that time, we learned of a future society driven by technology. Looking back, much of this has come to pass but not necessarily in the way that was predicted. Some capabilities, such as artificial intelligence (AI), have proved harder than expected whilst others, such as the Internet, have romped ahead transforming all industries and our every day lives. All of this change has lead to a fascinating career for those of us in the computing profession, and change is accelerating. What will the next 30 years bring? In this talk I will reflect on my career, what I see has driven technological transformation and how this can be used to frame the research challenges.

Biography

Mandy Chessell CBE FREng CEng FBCS is an IBM Distinguished Engineer, Master Inventor and Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. Mandy is a trusted advisor to executives from large organizations, working with them to develop their strategy and architecture relating to the governance, integration and management of information. She is also driving IBM's strategic move to open metadata and governance through the Apache Atlas open source project. More information about Mandy’s work and publications can be found on Wikipedia and on LinkedIn.

Poster and Demonstration Sessions

Organisers: Ikechukwu Nkisi-Orji; Kurt Portelli; Azwa Aziz; Gurleen Balyan

Please note: you have to print your own poster and bring it with you: we are not printing posters for you! Inky Little Fingers will print and ship posters for £23.83 inc VAT in a few days, or PDQ Print (Commercial St, on the map, about 10 minutes' walk from the main conference venue) can do last-minute printing for £33.60.

At this session, all delegates are invited to present their research to colleagues from other Scottish Universities. Each submitted poster will be reviewed by academics who are currently working within your research area. All posters will have an opportunity to compete for the Best Poster Award in three different categories: First year, Second year and Third year. You also have the opportunity to present a technology demonstration alongside your poster.  Delegates can therefore submit a poster, a demonstration, or both. Posters and demonstrations will compete separately.

Submission criteria

Entries will include at most 250 words description or abstract, which will be submitted with your poster or demonstration. You have the full freedom to design your posters as no templates will be provided. However, we do require that posters be printed on A0 size paper (portrait only). Each poster will be assigned a specific space in the exhibition hall that will be announced prior to the event.  Also, please note that participants bringing a technology demonstration should bring their own laptop and equipment (including cables). Please note that references (maximum 6) should be included in the poster abstract. The submission can include an appendix of a maximum 3 pages. Appendices may not be considered for reviews but can serve the purpose of clarifying something discussed in the poster abstracts.

Submissions should include:

Reviews

Our poster review panel will be comprised of experts from the seven SICSA research themes, who will evaluate each poster submission against the defined criteria and give them a score. Each poster will be evaluated by two or three panelists who will be experts in that theme. Please follow link for SICSA Research Themes.

Poster Categories:

1. First Year Poster

Objective: Students will write an extended abstract presenting background study of his/her research area followed by a research question. Research problem may or may not be very solid but it should be clear enough to judge its merits.

2. Second Year Poster

Objective: Students will write an extended abstract establishing a research statement and describing one or more feasible methods to reach his or her goal. Research statement needs to be clear and solvable.

3. Third Year Poster

Objective: Student will write an extended abstract to describe their PhD research work. It should have a thesis statement followed by a section describing design and methodology. Presentation of results and discussions are highly recommended.

4. Demonstration Category (all years)

Objective: Demonstrable technology (software or hardware) showcasing PhD research work or aspects of it.

Competition

Three submissions in each of the four categories will be shortlisted in advance based on reviews. During the conference, a panel will decide the winner in each, who will receive a £40 voucher. The best candidates from each will also have the opportunity to present their poster or demonstration at the final session on Day 2 of the conference. The format for presentations will be announced ahead of the event but duration for each presentation should not be more than 10 minutes.

Each submission will be assessed on the following equally-weighted criteria:

Key Dates

Abstract Submission: 11:59pm, 22nd May 2017.
Poster Submission: 11:59pm, 22nd May 2017.
Reviewers’ Feedback: 20th June 2017. 

Submission Instructions

During the registration process you will be asked if you intend to present a poster and/or demonstration at the conference. Choose the option that is relevant to you. If you are demonstrating a technology, you will also have the opportunity to tell us the equipments you are bringing so that we can make adequate arrangements for space. Please submit your poster abstract and poster PDF here.

Note:

Social Events & BBQ

The conference will feature a range of social activities in and around Dundee. The activities offer the opportunity to take a break from the classroom-based sessions; network with other delegates; and perhaps try an activity you’ve never done before!


Avertical World Climbing

Do you enjoy climbing or have always wanted to give it a go? We have 24 places available for indoor climbing. You will be split into 4 groups of 6, with each team getting their own instructor. All equipment (shoes, harness, and helmet) is provided. The venue recommends you wear a t-shirt, fleece (if cold), and stretchy/loose fitting trousers or track suit bottoms. Climbers who have long hair should tie back it back and jewellery/watches will need to be removed before climbing. Full details on the Avertical World website.

Avertical World is very close to the Dalhousie so it is only a short walk away.

Participants should wear loose-fitting clothing, thin ankle socks (as wearing hire shoes), spectacle wearers and people with long hair should bring a tie-back and rings/watches should be removed whilst climbing.

Photograph © Simon Li

McManus galleries

The McManus: Dundee's Art Gallery and Museum offers a fascinating insight into Dundee and with 8 galleries to explore, there is a wealth of information to discover in our exhibitions of art, history and the environment.

Learn more at the McManus website.

Photograph © John Lord


Camperdown, Dundee

We will arrange bus transport from the conference venue out to Dundee's Camperdown area, where a 9 screen cinema, go karting track, skating rink and wildlife park all combine to offer a variety of activities.

Ice skating

Want to do something cool? You can spend a couple of hours skating at Dundee's indoor ice rink. It will certainly make for an interesting way to get to know your fellow PhD students.

Photograph © Kenneth Malcolm

Scotkart Go-Karting

Feeling competitive? We have 14 places available for indoor karting. There will be a 10 lap qulifying/practice round, followed by a 14 lap race, and a medal presentation at the end. The venue provides race suits, helmets, and gloves so all you need are comfortable clothes to wear underneath, and flat shoes or trainers. Please note there is an additional fee of £2 you will have to pay on arrival for balaclavas (which you can keep at the end) and a minimum driver height of 1.5 meters: full details can be found on the ScotKart website.

We will provide a bus to take you from the Dalhousie to the venue and it will also take you back to your accommodation after you have finished.

Photograph © Kroszk

Cinema

June's schedule has yet to be announced, but with nine screens to choose from at Cineworld Dundee, anyone interested in taking in a film should find something to their liking.

Photograph © Alexandre Chassignon

Camperdown Wildlife Centre

With everything from eagles and owls to Clydesdale horses and bears, a walk round the Camperdown Wildlife Centre will give a tranquil and interesting break in the busy conference schedule.

Photograph © Glen Bowman


BBQ

BBQ image

After the social activities, there will be a barbeque and social evening starting at 19:30 at the Dundee University Students’ Association, on-campus.

There will be a bus leaving the accommodation for the BBQ at 19:00, returning at 21:30 - or for those wanting to make a night of it, delegates get free admission to DUSA's club night and access to the bar upstairs from 21:30 on.

Thesis Statements (Years 1-2)

Presenter Prof Iadh Ounis and Dr Craig Macdonald (University of Glasgow)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
Time Tuesday 27 June 2017, 10:30-12:00
Organisers Graham McDonald, Jarana Manotumruksa
RDF Domain Domain A: knowledge and intellectual abilities

Lecture slides now available here

Abstract

Every PhD student should have a main point, a main idea or central message in their research. The argument(s) the student makes in their thesis should reflect and support this main idea. The sentence that captures the position on this main idea is the thesis statement. This session will discuss the important characteristics of the thesis statement and how the statement should be developed to be the focal point of a PhD thesis.

There will be 2 Effective Writing: Thesis Statement sessions during the PhD conference. 1 session will be for students currently in the first or second year of their PhD, while the other session will be for students currently in the third or fourth year of their PhD. The session activities will be tailored to the attendee’s year of study and will focus on

All students attending the session will be asked to submit a copy of their thesis statement and research questions. The anonymized statements will be used as examples for discussion in the workshop.

Session Outline

 Learning Outcomes

LO1: The student should have a good understanding of the importance and purpose of a thesis statement.

LO2: The student should be able to identify the the characteristics of an effective thesis statement.

LO3: The student should be able to develop a thesis statement that explicitly outlines the purpose or the point of their research and can be argued for throughout their thesis.

Viva Survival

Presenter Dr Nia White (University of Abertay Dundee)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2F13
Time Tuesday 27 June 2017, 10:30-12:00
Organisers James Sutherland
RDF Domain D2 - Communication and Dissemination

Dr Nia White (Head of Abertay University's Graduate School) will talk about how to prepare for your viva and what to expect, as well as providing context on why vivas are done this way in the UK and some information about the approaches used in other countries.

Learning Outcomes

How to write a great paper and present it

Presenter Dr. Edwin Brady (University of St Andrews)
Location Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
Time Tuesday 27 June 2017, 10:30-12:00
Organisers Nadia Taou, Dejice Jacob
RDF Domain D2 - Communication and Dissemination, B1 - Personal qualities

Abstract

Every PhD student goes through the process of publishing papers about the research that they are doing. This is both for the purpose of obtaining relevant peer review and to consider the direction of their PhD. The process of writing up the research done so far in a conference paper format, where the arguments have to be cogent and succinct at the same time, is a balancing act. Receiving relevant feedback and peer review is also an important part of the process.

The session will focus on:

  1. How to present the argument / results in the best possible way

  2. The procedures required to submit a paper.

  3. The relevance of peer review

  4. Good practices to present the paper at a conference

Session Outline

 Learning Outcomes

LO1 : The student should have a good understanding of the general process and procedure of submitting papers for conferences

LO2 : The student should be able to identify the characteristics of an effective paper

LO3 : The student should be able to appreciate the relevance of robust feedback from peer review

LO4 : The student should be able to learn to robustly present and defend the research submitted at a conference

Academic Writing with LaTeX

Presenter Dr Sasa Radomirovic (University of Dundee)
Location Labs 1 and 2, Queen Mother Building
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 11:30-13:00
Organisers Garreth Tigwell, Nadia Taou
RDF Domain Domain A: Knowledge and Intellectual Abilities

Do you get frustrated formatting documents with Word? Do images randomly move? Is writing formulae a pain? Have you ever needed to quickly restyle a document? Then LaTeX is for you!

Content

Part 1 (15 minutes): An introduction will be given by the facilitator explaining what LaTeX is and why you will benefit from using LaTeX.

Part 2 (60 minutes): You will work through a LaTeX guide that will be made for the purposes of this workshop.

Part 3 (15 minutes): The workshop will re-group for a Q & A session.

Learning Outcomes

LO1: You will develop a good understanding of the importance and purpose of basic LaTeX.

LO2: You will be able to carry out formatting tasks such as use of sections, lists, figures, tables and reference.

LO3: You will gain the skills to deal with LaTeX errors.

Additional Information

We have enough computers for each of you during this workshop, however, you can bring your own laptops if you prefer. If you want to bring your own laptop, then LaTeX must already be installed. We recommend installing the following software for each operating system:

Mac – MacTeX from tug.org/mactex and TeXworks from tug.org/texworks

Linux – TeX Live from tug.org/texlive and TeXworks from tug.org/texworks

Windows – MiKTeX from miktex.org/download and TeXworks from tug.org/texworks

IBM Bluemix IoT Hands-on Workshop

Presenter Ross Cruikshank (IBM)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2F11
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 11:30-13:00; Wednesday 28 June 2017, 14:00-15:30
Organisers Dejice Jacob (University of Glasgow)
RDF Domain A1 (Knowledge base) A2 (Cognitive abilities) D1 (Working with others)

Note: This workshop is in two parts, anyone interested should register for and attend both sessions.

Abstract

IBM Bluemix allows developers to quickly and easily create, deploy and manage applications in the cloud. Bluemix is an implementation of IBM’s Open Cloud Architecture. This workshop will provide detailed introduction to Bluemix, and facilitate hands-on development activities with IoT devices (provided by IBM) for data acquisition and analytics. Bluemix supports a wide variety of runtimes and services including Node.js, Python, Ruby and Java.

Session Outline

 Learning Outcomes

LO1: You will work with others to develop online data processing pipelines for IoT sensor devices.

LO2: You will gain familiarity with the BlueMix platform-as-a-service cloud ecosystem.

LO3: You will analyse data streams using various standard techniques and metrics.

LO4: You will assess the relative merits of high-level component-based cloud engineering solutions.

 Additional Information

To participate in this interactive workshop, please bring a laptop with eduroam wifi access. Any OS is appropriate.

The Seven Hacks of Highly Effective PhD Students

Presenter Dr Jeremy Singer (University of Glasgow)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2F15
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 11:30-13:00
Organisers Dejice Jacob (University of Glasgow)
RDF Domain A1 (Knowledge base) A2 (Cognitive abilities) B2 (Self management)

Abstract

You are a Computer Scientist. You have access to powerful tools and techniques that can make your research activities much more effective and time-efficient. Use the tools, Luke! In this interactive workshop, we will outline common practical problems that face PhD students, and show how to use Unix tools to solve these problems. Awk, Bash, Grep and Gnuplot should be among your best friends!

Session Outline

Part 1 (30 minutes): Motivation for scripting and using Unix system tools. A small investment in learning time pays off with massive productivity gains throughout your research career. Then the facilitator will set seven ‘challenges’ and outline possible system tools that students could use to tackle these challenges.

Part 2 (30 minutes): Participants team up into groups to tackle one or more of the seven short challenges.

Part 3 (30 minutes): The workshop will re-group for a ‘show-and-tell’ interactive feedback session.

Learning Outcomes

LO1: You will be able to select appropriate system tools for common generic research tasks.

LO2: You will gain confidence in applying standard system tools to research tasks.

LO3: You will appraise the quality of results generated by various combinations of system tools.

LO4: You will assess the relative merits of accessible tutorial information about various system tools.

Additional Information

To participate in this interactive workshop, please bring a laptop with eduroam wifi access. Your laptop should be capable of running Unix command-line applications - so Linux or macOS are fine. Windows can be supported via Cygwin or Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Ethical, Social, and Professional Concerns in the Information Age

Presenter Prof Nick Taylor (Heriot-Watt University)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 11:30-13:00
Organisers Mr Boris Mocialov
RDF Domain C1 Professional Conduct

One of the traits of the age of the information is the fast-paced technological advancements, whether to support everyday life, entertain, or protect us. Today’s society would not be able to exist without the systems that appear and thrive around us. Reliability and quality of service are the crucial aspects of these systems that we mostly do not question and take for granted. Despite the immense confidence we have in the services that these systems provide, it is worth asking how much thought goes into issues not directly related to the development of these new technologies? In the workshop we will explore these questions from the perspective of different technologies that are either already well-established in our society or are on the horizon and will soon be introduced into our everyday lives.

Objectives

Participants

Students or professionals at any stage of their research

Workshop structure

  1. Presentation (10-15 minutes)
    • Introduction to the Workshop
    • Introduction to the ethical, social, and professional issues in CS
    • Agenda/Plan
    • Directional questions made visible while students discuss their topics
  2. Let students discuss distributed abstracts/topics. One abstract per group from the following topics: (30-45 min)
    • Robotic Warfare
    • AI Filtering of Social Media Postings
    • Contemporary Socialisation
    • Artificial Companionship and Sex
    • Cyborgs and Bionic People
    • Nanotechnology
    • Personal Filter Bubbles
    • Public Safety vs Individual Privacy
    • Automated Profiling
    • Robotic Personhood
  3. Groups present their findings (20 min)
  4. Common theme? Any other ideas? Closing (10 min)
    • Publishable white paper?

Learning Outcomes

Thesis Statements (Years 3-4)

Presenter Prof Iadh Ounis and Dr Craig Macdonald (University of Glasgow)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 14:00-15:30
Organisers Graham McDonald, Jarana Manotumruksa
RDF Domain Domain A: knowledge and intellectual abilities

Lecture slides now available here

Abstract

Every PhD student should have a main point, a main idea or central message in their research. The argument(s) the student makes in their thesis should reflect and support this main idea. The sentence that captures the position on this main idea is the thesis statement. This session will discuss the important characteristics of the thesis statement and how the statement should be developed to be the focal point of a PhD thesis.

There will be 2 Effective Writing: Thesis Statement sessions during the PhD conference. 1 session will be for students currently in the first or second year of their PhD, while the other session will be for students currently in the third or fourth year of their PhD. The session activities will be tailored to the attendee’s year of study and will focus on

All students attending the session will be asked to submit a copy of their thesis statement and research questions. The anonymized statements will be used as examples for discussion in the workshop.

Session Outline

 Learning Outcomes

LO1: The student should have a good understanding of the importance and purpose of a thesis statement.

LO2: The student should be able to identify the the characteristics of an effective thesis statement.

LO3: The student should be able to develop a thesis statement that explicitly outlines the purpose or the point of their research and can be argued for throughout their thesis.

Teaching 101 - CS Teaching Challenges (When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Going)

Presenter Prof Quintin Cutts (University of Glasgow), Dr Karen Petrie (University of Dundee)
Location Dalhousie Building, room 2G03
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 14:00-15:30
Organisers Oluwafemi Olukoya, Oseghale Igene
RDF Domain D3 - Engagement and Impact

Abstract

Do you want to enhance your CS teaching skills? Are you considering taking a job as an academic after your Ph.D.? Do you find teaching programming challenging? Are you a GTA or a lab demonstrator? Then, Teaching 101 is the workshop for you!

During this workshop, you will learn the rudiments of learning theories and how they drive successful CS teaching. These theories help to highlight flaws in our typical teaching methods. This session will focus on:

Session Outline

Learning Outcomes

Scientific Methods in Research

Presenter Prof Alan Bundy (University of Edinburgh)
Location Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
Time Wednesday 28 June 2017, 14:00-15:30
Organisers Gibrail Islam
RDF Domain Domain A: knowledge and intellectual abilities

Lecture slides now available here

We will survey and summarise the typical methodologies used in computing research, including both theoretical and experimental methodologies. Our emphasis will be on best practice, ensuring the validity and highest quality of the results of your research. We will emphasise the importance of formulating precise and evaluable hypotheses or claims, making it clear to your readers what claims you are and are not making, then providing an evaluation that supports (or perhaps refutes) your claims. We will warn you about some of the most common pitfalls in computing research, so you avoid or recover from them.

Learning Outcomes

Workshops

This year's conference features 10 workshops, across three of the four RDF skill domains. From the technical and academic skills in writing and presenting conference papers to ethics, Internet of Things and how to get started teaching in universities, every delegate can learn valuable new skills.

Programme

Import to Calendar

Printed Conference Programme (PDF)

Tuesday, 27 June

09:30-10:20Registration and bag drop
Dalhousie Building foyer
10:20-10:30Opening Talks - Jeremy Singer and Rachel Menzies
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
10:30-12:00Thesis Statements (Years 1-2)
Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
Viva Survival
Dalhousie Building, room 2F13
How to write a great paper and present it
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
12:00-12:10Coffee break
Dalhousie Building foyer
12:10-13:00Poster and Demonstration Sessions (part 1)
Dalhousie Building Main Foyer
13:00-14:00Lunch
Dalhousie Building foyer
14:00-15:15Keynote — Prof Chris van der Kuyl
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
15:15-17:15Social Events & BBQ
Various
17:15-19:00Check-in/free time
19:00-21:30BBQ - Dundee University Students' Association

Wednesday, 28 June

09:30-10:00Registration, coffee
Dalhousie Building foyer
10:00-10:10Introduction - Jeremy Singer and Rachel Menzies
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
10:10-11:15Keynote — Prof Mandy Chessell: Progressive Turmoil
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
11:15-11:30Coffee break
Dalhousie Building foyer
11:30-13:00Academic Writing with LaTeX
Labs 1 and 2, Queen Mother Building
IBM Bluemix IoT Hands-on Workshop (part 1)
Dalhousie Building, room 2F11
The Seven Hacks of Highly Effective PhD Students
Dalhousie Building, room 2F15
Ethical, Social, and Professional Concerns in the Information Age
Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
13:00-14:00Lunch
Dalhousie Building foyer
Poster and Demonstration Sessions (part 2)
Dalhousie Building Main Foyer
14:00-15:30IBM Bluemix IoT Hands-on Workshop (part 2)
Dalhousie Building, room 2F11
Thesis Statements (Years 3-4)
Dalhousie Building, room 2G13
Teaching 101 - CS Teaching Challenges (When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Going)
Dalhousie Building, room 2G03
Scientific Methods in Research
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4
15:30-16:00Presentations, Prizes, Close
Dalhousie Building, Main Lecture Theatre 4

Committee

Venue

The main conference events will take place in the University of Dundee's Dalhousie Building, shown on the map below. For navigation purposes, the postcode is DD1 5EN.

Click map to enlarge, or download printable high quality map

ESC to return

Map courtesy of the Dundee & Angus Convention Bureau, who also provide other information about Dundee.

There is free WiFi available on campus via both Eduroam and The Cloud: WiFi for guests on campus.

Keynote Speakers

This year's keynote speakers are Chris van der Kuyl and Mandy Chessell.

Prof Chris van der Kuyl

Chris is one of Scotland's leading entrepreneurs. Chairman of 4J Studios, former CEO of brightsolid Limited and founder of computer games company Vis - best known for its top selling game, State of Emergency. Born in Dundee, Chris has lived his whole life in the city, including a BSc (Hons) from the University of Dundee before becoming a visiting Professor of Digital Entertainment at the University of Abertay Dundee.

Prof Mandy Chessell

Professor Mandy Chessell CBE FREng is a Distinguished Engineer at IBM and Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, with 45 patents in transaction processing, development and management and an Honorary Doctorate of Technology from the University of South Wales.

Sponsors

This conference would not be possible without the generous support of our sponsors:

Home

The SICSA PhD Conference 2017 took place at the University of Dundee on 27th and 28th June. The next conference will be in 2018, with details to be posted here soon.

Each conference brings together Computing Science and Informatics PhD students, leading academics, and industry practitioners for 2 days of workshops, keynote presentations, poster sessions and exciting social events.

Keynote speakers in 2017 included one of Scotland’s leading entrepreneurs, Chris van der Kuyl; and Mandy Chessell, Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and Distinguished Engineer at IBM.

The conference is organised by a committee of PhD students, University staff and members of the SICSA Executive.

The event is fully funded by SICSA and our sponsors, there are no registration fees or accommodation charges.

Site design © James A Sutherland / SICSA Conference Committee 2017 | Tay Bridge photograph © Neil Williamson 2015